Call for a free consultation
(904) 632-2424

Real Efforts Are Being Made to Help Miami, Florida Become More Cycling Friendly!

Posted by Chris Burns in Cycling Advocacy, on .

Congratulations to cycling advocates, EMERGE MIAMI, Miami’s Bicycle Pedestrian Coordinator, Collin Worth, as well as Miami Mayor Manny Diaz for efforts being made to improve bicycling safety. There is no question it’s needed. According to the report entitled, “Dangerous By Design”, by Transportation For America, metro Miami area is the fourth most dangerous urban area for pedestrians and cyclists in the United States.

Real Efforts Made by Miami to be Bicycle Friendly

Posted by Chris Burns in Cycling Advocacy, Cycling News, on .

​Congratulations to cycling advocates, EMERGE MIAMI, Miami’s Bicycle Pedestrian Coordinator, Collin Worth, as well as Miami Mayor Manny Diaz for efforts being made to improve bicycling safety. There is no question it’s needed. According to the report entitled, “Dangerous By Design”, by Transportation For America, metro Miami area is the fourth most dangerous urban area for pedestrians and cyclists in the United States. From 2000-2009, Miami had 1,555 pedestrian deaths! Almost 22% of Miami’s traffic deaths were suffered by pedestrians. Cyclists are also suffering, and the death rate seems to be on the rise. In 2009, Miami Dade County had 12 bicycling fatalities, Broward had 11, and Palm Beach had 13. In the same year, Miami Dade County had 65 pedestrian deaths, Broward had 44, and Palm Beach County had 37.

National Bike To Work Week

Posted by Chris Burns in Cycling Advocacy, on .

​The month of May is National Bike Month, and is officially sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists. The League, a nationwide cycling advocacy organization, was formed by several prominent cyclists, including Albert Augustus Pope, in 1880. Mr. Pope was at the forefront of bicycle manufacturing in the United States. In the 1890s, he manufactured about 250,000 bicycles per year, and due to his patents, nearly every other bicycle producer in the U.S. had to pay him $10 per bicycle.